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3D stratigraphy

Archaeology is one of the sciences were annotations and precise documentation are most important because evidence is destroyed during work. An important aspect of this is the stratigraphy. This reflects the different layers of soil that correspond to different time periods in an excavated sector. Due to practical limitations this stratigraphy is often only recorded for some slices, not for the whole sector.

Our technique allows a more optimal approach. For every layer a complete 3D model of the excavated sector can be generated. Since this only involves taking a series of pictures this does not slow down the progress of the archaeological work. In addition it is possible to model artifacts separately which are found in these layers and to include the models in the final 3D stratigraphy.

This concept is illustrated in Figure 9.21. The excavations of an ancient Roman villa at Sagalassos were recorded with our technique. In the figure a view of the 3D model of the excavation is provided for two different layers.

Figure 9.21: 3D stratigraphy, the excavation of a Roman villa at two different moments.
\begin{figure}\centerline{
\psfig{figure=results/D2L1.ps, height=5cm}
\psfig{figure=results/D2L2.ps, height=5cm}}\end{figure}


next up previous contents
Next: Generating and testing building Up: More applications in archaeology Previous: More applications in archaeology   Contents
Marc Pollefeys 2002-11-22