Final Program: Tetris


  • Assigned On: 11/30/2005
  • Due On: Canceled
  • Description:

    Write the game Tetris. In Tetris, shapes with 4 blocks ("tet" = 4) fall into a well. With the keypad, you can move the falling shape to the left and right. With the 'a' key, you can rotate the shapes counterclockwise, with the 's' key, you can rotate the shape clockwise. With the space key, you can put the block into free-fall, dropping it rapidly into position.

    There are seven shapes: a line, a square, a "T", two "L"'s, and two "Z"'s. The L's and Z's have a "handedness" - that is, a left-handed L cannot be rotated to superimpose with a right-handed L.

    When you have filled a row on the board, you eliminate all the blocks in that row. All of the blocks above that row shift downwards exactly 1 row. Generally, if you eliminate n rows, the blocks in the rows above shift downwards n rows. Your score improves the more rows you simultaneously eliminate. The score in my game is as follows:

    • 1 row = 1 point
    • 2 rows = 4 points
    • 3 rows = 9 points
    • 4 rows = 16 points


    Your game should get faster as the user eliminates lines. My program increases the drop rate once for every ten lines that the user eliminates.

    The game ends when the location of a new shape is already occupied by a previously fallen block.

    I am providing some source code you may use. This code describes the geometry of each of the seven blocks in all of their orientations. It also describes the cells that each shape passes through during a rotation. I call these cells "forbidden".

    When the user presses the right arrow key, you cannot move a block to the right unless that motion is allowed (collision free); so 1) you check to see if you can move a block to the right, and if so 2) then you move the block to the right.

    Likewise, when the user presses 'a' or 's', you cannot rotate the block unless that rotation is allowed. This means, checking to see if the cells for each block in the alternate orientation are unoccupied. But what about the cells that the shape "passes through" during the rotation? I have encoded the geometry of those cells through which a block passes in any given rotation in an array of GridPositions. I call these "forbidden" cells. If you would prefer not to use forbidden cells in your program, you may leave them out. They do offer a realistic feel to the game.

    TetrisShape.java
    Here are some pictures of the shapes:

    In addition to providing the source code above, I've also documented the process I underwent in creating my version of tetris. I will share with you some of the prototypes I wrote along the way. NOTE: You do not have to write any of these prototypes if you do not feel like it. You should not turn in a set of prototypes, only a single program.

    • prot1.html
    • prot2.html
    • prot3.html
    • prot4.html
    • prot5.html
    • prot6.html
    • prot7.html
    • prot8.html
    • prot9.html
    • prot10.html
    • prot11.html
    • prot12.html
    • prot13.html
    • prot14.html
    • prot15.html
    • prot16.html
    • prot17.html
    • prot18.html
    • Here is an example of how your program should behave and what it could look like: Click on the applet to start the game.




      Current High Score: Bryan, 200



      Mail me a screenshot of your high score (disclaimer: you gain nothing by having the high score)

      Grading

      • A: Shapes fall. Keyboard control of shape motion and rotation. Shapes stack. The game-over condition is handled properly. The shapes rotate properly. Full rows are eliminated. The space bar causes free-fall. The game gradually speeds-up. The user gets a score for their performance.
      • B: Shapes fall. Keyboard control of shape motion and rotation. Shapes stack. The game-over condition is handled properly. The shapes rotate properly. Row elimination is attempted, but buggy. The space bar causes free-fall. The game gradually speeds-up.
      • C: Shapes fall. Keyboard control of shape motion and rotation. Shapes stack. The game-over condition is handled properly. The blocks rotate proplerly.
      • D: Shapes fall. Keyboard control of shape motion and rotation. Shapes stack.
      • F: Minimal display functionality: boundary drawn, some shapes drawn.


      Post the applet on your website so that people can come by and play it.


      Type the honor pledge at the top of your .java file(s) in a comment block.

      Zip 1) your .java file(s), 2) your .class file(s), and 3) a text file with the URL of your webpage where I can view your program into a single file. Name that file <your onion>_pr05.zip. That's the name it should have on your computer. Use blackboard to SEND your .zip file.